SELECTED ARTICLES: GENERAL PROBLEMS & ADVICE
  Author Article Title Posted Date Article Sum Article Downloads
View Jackie Durnin Will using sign language with babies delay speech? 9/25/2007 Baby Sign Language is a growing phenomenon around Australia after the inception of using sign language with babies began in America.
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View Boris Gindis, Ph.D. What should adoptive parents know about their children’s language-based school difficulties? Part 4. 11/3/2005 In the series of articles Dr. Gindis explains what happens with the language of adoptees from foreign countries when they arrive to the US and begin their life in American families. Dr. Gindis explains why language metamorphosis in internationally adopted children are often the reason for so many school issues, specific to these children only and what parents need to know to help their children to overcome these problems. This is part 4 of the series.
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View Devnet What is baby sign language? 12/23/2008 There's good news for parents and babies and its welcome news indeed. It's called baby sign language. The lack of a means for communication between a parent and a baby has always been frustrating for both parties. A parent hears their child crying and is helpless to understand what the baby wants. They do the standard checks, like feeling the diaper for wetness or putting their hand on the baby's head to check for fever.
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View SEO Consulting Using Sign Language And Music To Communicate With Your Newborn 7/31/2009 Why should hearing children learn sign language? How can Deaf children participate in and enjoy music? What is music mediated sign language instruction?
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View Tatyana Elleseff MA CCC-SLP Understanding the extent of speech and language delays in older internationally adopted children 10/25/2011 This article introduces options available to parents with regard to determining the extent of their child’s birth language delay at the time of adoption. It refutes select myths regarding common school placements (e.g., ESL) for adopted children as well as reviews strategies of qualifying school age children with birth language delays for speech language services. The article reiterates the difference between communicative and cognitive language mastery of adopted children as well as cites select resources (e.g., letter template) available for parents who are requesting speech language services for their adopted child within the school system.
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